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Why don‘t you write something nice?

A horse walks into a bar…

If you‘ve been following me on Facebook, you already know me a bit. And some of you might ask: „Why are you so bloody pessimistic? Why do you have to swear so much? Why do you have such a bad temper? Why do you drag everything and everyone through the mire? Why is there so much sarcasm in your articles?” Well, in this article I’ll try to explain all that, because, in the end, I am not pessimistic at all, I don’t hate the universe, humanity, or, you.

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White Castles, White Fields

Through the Plain towards Pamukkale

Flowering trees

Flowering trees

After leaving the Mediterranean we headed east on a straight and almost flat road. Our next destination was Pamukkale. We passed the ruins of Efesos without entering the ancient city. The fee to get in was probably exorbitant anyway and I had no knowledge of the city’s history. A visit would have been nothing more but strolling among some old stones.

Erkan in front of his Ekomini market

Erkan in front of his Ekomini market

Erkan invited us for coffee. He was very nice but unfortunately my Turkish is still too bad for a real conversation.

An old muslim Cemetery

An old muslim Cemetery

It almost seems that zombies must come out of the ground every second.

After Efeler we turned south for a few kilometers to get away from the heavy traffic of the main road, then headed east again, onto a smaller sidetrack that ran along the base of the mountains delimiting the plain we were riding through. Riding here instead of the truck-infested four lane trunk road was far more rewarding.

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Izmir: Turning East

Izmir Sightseeing with Sencer

The metropolitan area of Izmir is situated on the shores of a large bay that reaches almost fifty kilometres inland and is surrounded on all sides by high mountains. All along the flat shoreline and lining the lower slopes of the mountains air-conditioned multi-storey buildings dominate the townscape. In contrast to Istanbul, where almost every square inch of soil was covered by concrete and tarmac, its narrow streets clogged with heavy traffic, Izmir had a lot more open space along the shoreline. The whole city was criss-crossed by wide boulevards and dotted with parks.

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Marmara Region: Turkish People just Love Çay

This Route is the Best

Me in my Master of Puppets shirt close to Manyas

Me in my Master of Puppets shirt close to Manyas

After we had been riding through landscapes dominated by farmland and hills with olive groves on them, today was the first time we had to climb a longer slope. On our way to the first little mountain pass of the tour, an attentive Turkish man stopped his vehicle and felt the urge to explain the correct route to us. What Turkish people (amongst many others) fail to notice is, that we had already planned a route and knew exactly where we were going. They were also oblivious to the fact that cyclists preferred different types of roads and terrain than drivers of cars or lorries. Roads that are impassable for them might be just perfect for us and a wide, well paved highway that you can rush your car on at high speed are one of our worst nightmares.

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Istanbul and the Marmara Region


Our room in the Chillout-Hostel

Our room in the Chillout-Hostel

A bit smallish, bunk beds without a ladder, no working light and the heating was operating in furnace mode.

If your have read the first two articles (Start in Istanbul and Wild Trips through Istanbul), written by Malte, you have learned that our trip began in a rather turbulent way. As a master of procrastination I managed to put off all preparations until it became almost impossible to sort everything out before our departure. The bikes were ready to ride except for some small details like mudguards and front racks that were still not attached to the frames.

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Wild Trips through Istanbul

Wet Socks

In the last article I had explained how Ollo, Mia, Etti, Jani, Boris and I traveled to snow-ridden Istanbul to celebrate Ollo’s and Mia’s world cycling tour.

Tourism in snowy Istanbul

Tourism in snowy Istanbul

Together we expored the European part of Istanbul, south of the Golden Horn.

Jani and Boris had finally managed to get to Istanbul and the plan for this Friday afternoon was to visit the sights of the city together. We went to Galata Bridge again – this time on a significantly shorter route, although still not optimal – and crossed the Golden Horn to discover the touristic area to the south of the bay.

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Around the World: Start in Istanbul

Plans for conquering Istanbul

On the 18th of February 2015 it finally happened: Ollo and Mia began the second leg of their “Around the World” trip. The plan was to start in Istanbul and cycle for fourteen months through countries like Turkey, Iran, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, China, Laos, Cambodia all the way down to Singapore. And after that, who knows … maybe Australia. In 2011, Ollo and Mia rode from Passau to Istanbul on their Around the World ’11 trip — I’m sure Ollo will tell about it on the blog someday (Ollo: Yes he will). One day the idea to accompany them to Istanbul and bid them farewell came to our minds. Thus we all – that is Ollo, Mia, Etti (the king of bad jokes, already known from earlier articles), Jani, Boris, and I (Malte) – set out for the airport this Wednesday morning. It would become a memorable trip and now that Ollo and Mia have begun their world tour, Ollo proposed that I write a guest article to tell about the beginning of the journey.
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I’d like to thank all the following people for their support during my adventure. I highly appreciate your help and kindness.


  • My parents and my brother who support me despite they doubt the sense of this trip.
  • Patrick Schiel for kicking my ass when it was necessary.
  • Malte, who proofread the first articles on radwild.
  • Boris, Jani, Etti and Malte again for accompanying me to Istanbul to celebrate my birthday and see us of for the trip.
  • The Hot Dogs and the Wild Cats crew who had to find a new drummer once again.
  • My former flatmates Ramona and Carola for cleaning up the mess I left behind when I left.
  • Everyone at home who I forgot to mention. If you think I forgot to mention you, just kick my leg, slap my ear and write me an email.


  • Sencer from Izmir hosted us for two days and showed us around Izmir. Thanks for the great evening at the theatre.
  • Erkan from a small village near Denizli for giving us coffee instead of tea for breakfast.
  • SDS Bisiklet in Antalya for cheap brake pads and for the offer to host us for one night if we don't find a place to stay.
  • Mehmet from Antalya for enduring us four nights long and who also wants to do a long bike trip one day.
  • Meriç and Hero from Avanos who let us sleep in their flat for three nights and performed some extreme chilling action with us.

Finally I want to thank the hundreds of people who helped us along the way and who turned this trip into more than just a long holiday. Very few of you will have realised that you did anything in the first place, except for giving us food or a place to sleep, show us the way or just smile. But I'd like to thank you for the things that remained invisible to your eyes, the things that made this trip an adventure and restored my faith in humanity again and again.

Thanks for changing me without noticing it. Thanks for enabling me to see the world with different eyes, for making a trip like this possible, for making me what I am now and for turning this journey into unknown lands into a journey to myself.

A Serbian Road Movie


Country road in Croatia

Country road in Croatia

We rose from our cozy beds and had a lush breakfast with our dog saviors before hitting the road again. My back tyre was almost dead and in some places the rubber was completely gone but I wanted to see for how long it would hold before it finally conks out. My chain tore again and I had to remove two more chain links. Because of this I was not able to use all the gears, but the most important ones still worked. After riveting the chain I also found the Power Links I had been looking for since the chain tore for the first time (with Power Links you can open and close a chain without a rivet and without any tools – very useful!).
Destroyed water tower in Vukovar

Destroyed water tower in Vukovar

Many buildings in Vukovar were preserved in their damaged state as a memorial to the battle of 1991.

Shortly before dusk we rolled into Vukovar, a Croatian city in which many of the damaged buildings hadn’t been repaired since the Battle for Vukovar. Today, these buildings act as a monument against the war. Probably the most famous building is the old water tower. Its wall has been breached by a grenade shell. We found a spot for the tent right next to the city. During dinner we found out that tuna with sweet-sour sauce tastes goes together as well as chocolate cream and salami. A bottle of sweet red wine provided solace during this cacophony of taste.
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